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KIDS
Pint-Sized Perspective on Decluttering and Moving

This piece for ARTIcles was inspired by a neighbor who spoke with Artifcts co-founder Ellen Goodwin about the woes of all that "kid stuff" to get through in preparation for a move this summer. Thank you for being our muse! And if you missed our adult-sized version of decluttering to move, give it a read ->  

From the time Violet was a baby and stretching well into toddlerhood, she moved a lot, bopping around Maryland, Virginia, and Texas. Her age made it easier on us, the parents, in that she didn't fully realize what was happening. She was also in a phase of life during which she naturally was outgrowing everything from books and toys to baby furniture and clothing at a fast pace, so purging during each move was simplified a bit. 

Then she turned six.  

"I'm ooo-l-d," she whined. Insert palm in face on every parent who hears this sweet nonsense. Mitigating her pain somewhat was the fact that her 6th birthday was in fact extra special - it fell on Easter. So, we called it "B-Easter," and managed an impromptu egg hunt blended with tea party, followed by chalk, bubbles, kites, and bikes. Not bad! 

photo of chalk on pavement "Happy B-Easter"

What we were less prepared for was the storm brewing behind this sweet looking little Texan's face after sharing a few days later that they would be moving. You'd think we stole her puppy! "But you did make a New Year's Resolution to buy a house this year," teased my husband. (True story! What kind of "resolution" is that?!) 

Violet began plotting. How could she pack EVERYTHING? How could she make her new home JUST like her current home? She packed boxes herself. She filled bags and tried knotting them closed before I could even look and confirm it was really just full of her Beanie Boos. It was cute and annoying simultaneously. We had to get going! 

colorful collection of Beanie BoosClick the image to view the Beanie Boo collection Artifct.

While the word "fair" is banned in our household Try it! It's amazing how many other, more informative words your kid will use when fair is off the table it was deemed "fair game" to use her passions and personality to help manage the situation. Decluttering was going to happen as packing proceeded. Not everything was getting on the moving truck, whether you were 6 or 36. And we did not want to end enemies.  

Tried & Tested Pint-Sized Strategies

Here are the strategies we used with our 6-year-old, and more recently with a set of adult children who were equally disinclined to part ways with a lot of stuff all at once.  

  1. Don't make it an "all at once" task. Friendly disclaimer: We know, sometimes a move is unexpected and abrupt. This then does not apply. In general, you have some notice, maybe even months, to prepare for a move. Consider starting with your child's least used and noticeable items in deep drawers, backs of closets, bins and boxes that have collected dust, and 'stuff' that truly doesn't fit (or work!) anymore. Something small each weekend. Let them play and experience it one last time if they want as they sort into piles to rehome, donate, recycle, resell, or maybe even trash. Smallest box is for the move.  
     
  2. And time it. Ask them to focus on the task for no more than 15 minutes. For 6-year-old Violet that was less than one episode of Sofia the First and totally manageable.  
     
  3. Know thy child. Appeal to sweet spots. Violet loves, loves, loves to be a helper. Extending that to helping others who have unmet needs for new books, clothes, and toys was a major source of success and pride. She even made cards to go with her donations. And the donations were not generic. We brought some into a women's shelter, for example, where we knew who would directly benefit locally. Seeing is believing, even when you're six. 
     
  4. Take photos and videos (and Artifct it!) of special items that don't make the cut. Have you noticed how kids of all ages, even at 56, love to browse photos and videos on their phone, in social media, etc.? We even have a video of 2-year-old Violet dancing and the moment she stops you can hear her say, "I want to see!" Sometimes you just like to see something to trigger that happy nostalgia or moments of pride from that hard one roller skating derby or large collections of anything that can't possibly come or maybe will but cannot be displayed in its entirety.  
     
  5. Embrace porch or garage sales. There's simple logic in favor of selling a large amount of 'stuff' even for low prices and gaining the power to buy that new whiz-bang toy or container of slime or funny hat all by yourself! Kids don't generally have money of their own and this is a good opportunity to reward their help in the decluttering process. Violet sold books she'd outgrown and a several movies too. 
     

Special Case: Moving to a New Country

Another friendly disclaimer: In a country as large as the US, another state can sure feel like another country ... No matter the excitement and motivation to make the leap and move to a foreign country, I empathize with what you will go through in terms of energy, cost, and general discombobulation. Every move we made was hard but heading into a foreign culture amplifies the desire for the comfort familiar objects, foods, music, and more can offer.  

International moving and shipping fees, or conversely long-term self-storage fees, may mean your decluttering and downsizing tasks are more extreme. This is definitely a time Artifcts can help. Want to show off your transformer collection ... special dolls ... cool bike ... but can't take them with you? Artifct to remember and show your new friends what your life was like in your home country! 

We bet you can adapt these ideas to your own kids. Or, if you are a professional organizer, we hope these tactics can help you as you work with clients in similar situations.

Happy Artifcting! 

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© 2022 Artifcts, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Bonus Epilogue: Lessons From Artifcting With My Mother

Whether your parents were cleaning out their basement, or you were reclaiming bins of childhood memories of your own volition, maybe you have also stumbled upon heirlooms that made you go, "Hmmm?" Enjoy this short epilogue to this week's ARTIcles story Five Lessons From Artifcting With My Mother. We hope it makes you smile.

I'm not much of a collector, certainly not a hoarder. And yet guess what I found in my mish-mash dresser drawer - teeth. An uncontained, random assortment of Violet's baby teeth.

random baby tooth in a drawer

Before you rush to judgment, hear me (and surely other parents!) out.

Far too often I would lay down to sleep only to bolt up with the, "Agh! I'm the tooth fairy!" realization. I’d rush out to contrive something clever to swap for the tooth she'd lost, usually a dollar coin or a paper dollar folded origami style into a heart. Then I'd toss the tooth in said drawer to avoid her finding it in the trash or elsewhere and promptly forget about it after drifting to sleep.

Now, those Victorians knew a thing or two about saving hair and teeth. But we are not in Victorian times. I even understand the idea of going off on a trip or to even war and bringing a lock of hair with for luck or remembrance. But I am genuinely curious as to why so many people choose to keep these human relics in modern times, a trend I assume exists because companies exist to help us transform them into jewelry, framed wonders, and more.

Even my mother saved locks of hair I had cut off as a child.
Envelope marked in pencil with description of hair locks inside
Upon discovery, I Artifcted it (here - or click the image above), and promptly tossed it, or, if you prefer, "decluttered" and let it go. No judgement whatsoever on my mom, but for me it was a hard, "No."

I would beseech anyone who keeps hair or teeth as heirlooms to Artifct them. Why did you keep them? What memories do they evoke? Will you be heartbroken and haunt the living if they one day choose to let go of them because they see them as trash not heirlooms? My mom gave me free rein to do as I pleased with my locks of hair, but not everyone may feel the same.

If you have questions along the way, contact us here at Hello@Artifcts.com and we’ll be happy to help you jump into the Arti Life.
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© 2022 Artifcts, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
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